Health – Brian Fung – This Is Your Brain on Diet Soda: How Fake Sugar Makes You Overeat – The Atlantic

The murky waters of diet soda science may have just gotten a little clearer, though. New research shows that the sugar substitutes used in diet beverages actually change how our brains’ reward areas work.

Researchers took 24 young adults, half of whom were habitual diet soda drinkers who consumed a sugar-free beverage once a day or more. The other half avoided diet soda. Hooking them up to brain scanning equipment, the scientists fed each group of study participants a stream of water sweetened alternately by natural and artificial sweeteners.

Because the brain’s reward center is also responsible for controlling energy intake and the motivation to eat, the scientists believe that their results help explain why diet sodas appear to drive people to consume more food than they should:

One of the strongest links seen was diminishing activation of an area known as the caudate head as a recruit’s diet soda consumption climbed. This area is associated with the food motivation and reward system. Green and Murphy also point out that decreased activation of this brain region has been linked with elevated risk of obesity.

[…]

“The brain normally uses a learned relationship between sweet taste and the delivery of calories to help it regulate food intake,” Swithers explains. But when a sweet food unreliably delivers bonus calories, the brain “suddenly has no idea what to expect.” Confused, she says, this regulator of food intake learns to ignore sweet tastes in its predictions of a food’s energy content.

It’s worth remembering that this is a small-scale study, performed in a way that leaves room for error. Still, it’s the latest report suggesting that a scientific connection may exist between diet sodas and poor health — a finding that could expand the scope of anti-obesity efforts.

via Health – Brian Fung – This Is Your Brain on Diet Soda: How Fake Sugar Makes You Overeat – The Atlantic.

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